LIVING    

GLUTEN FREE

If you have been suffering from fatigue, diarrhea, vomiting, breathlessness or irritable bowel symptoms, these could be due to Celiac disease. 

Celiac disease is a serious, lifelong, gastrointestinal disorder that can cause a wide spectrum of clinical symptoms such us diarrhea, abdominal distension, weight loss, malnutrition and skin disorders due to permanent intolerance to gluten, a complex mixture of proteins found in wheat, barley and rye.

If this is the case, the celiac test kit may be right for you. Genesure is as accurate as tests performed in a hospital laboratory.

HOW TO GET STARTED

Getting started on the gluten-free diet can be easy. Here are some simple steps to guide you:

Getting started on the gluten-free diet can be easy. Here are some simple steps to guide you:

Concentrate on the familiar foods you can eat. These include: 

 

Fresh fruits and vegetables
Meat and fish that have not been breaded, marinated or processed
Rice, corn and potatoes
Eggs,nuts (in shells or unshelled), beans and legumes
Fruit juices, unflavored milk, whole and ground coffee beans, unflavored tea
Oils, including canola oil

Plain does not have to mean bland. Plain spices and herbs are gluten free so use them to add flavor to your food

Learn which grains to avoid. These contain gluten and are not safe:

Wheat. This includes spelt,kamut, triticale, semolina (durum wheat), farina, einkorn, bulgar, couscous, graham, modified wheat starch, wheat starch, wheat germ, wheat bran, whole wheat, cracked wheat, cake flour, matzo flour and matzo meal. Buckwheat is gluten free (see below). Wheat will be clearly labeled on all packaged food regulated by the FDA.

Rye. This grain is mainly used in bread. Except for rye flavoring, there are few, if any, ingredients made from rye.

Barley. In addition to the grain, barley is often used to make malt flavoring, which you have to avoid. Although not required to do so by law, many companies clearly label malt flavoring.

Oats do not contain gluten but are usually cross-contaminated by wheat. Only oats specifically labeled “gluten free” are safe.

Learn which grains are gluten-free and how to include them in your meals. These grains are versatile and nutritious.

Rice
Montina
Corn
Quino
Amaranth

Teff
Buckwheat (kasha)
Sorghum
Soy (Soy sauce fermented from wheat is not gluten free)

Learn about gluten-free flours

All the gluten-free grains are ground into flour. Gluten-free flour is also made from potatoes, tapioca, nuts and beans. You can buy them in health foods stores and increasingly in supermarkets and on the Internet. There are numerous gluten-free cookbooks and you will find gluten-free recipes in cookbooks you already use. Some of your old recipes may already be gluten-free or easily adapted to be gluten free.

 

Don’t count out pasta! A variety of gluten-free pastas are now available including those made from rice, corn, quinoa and buckwheat. (Buckwheat noodles are also called Soba noodles. Read the label to make sure they are 100 percent buckwheat and do not include any wheat.)

 

Don’t count out pasta! A variety of gluten-free pastas are now available including those made from rice, corn, quinoa and buckwheat. (Buckwheat noodles are also called Soba noodles. Read the label to make sure they are 100 percent buckwheat and do not include any wheat.)

Is it Gluten Free?
A Basic Diet Guide for Celiacs

Getting the gluten-free diet right is easy when you know the ground rules. Follow the guidelines below and you will be on your way to a happy, healthy gluten-free life.
This material is not intended to provide medical advice, which should be obtained directly from a physician.

 

Not quite sure? Test your food with EZ Gluten test strips.

YES

Foods made from grains (and grain-like plants) that do notcontain harmful gluten, including: Corn in all forms (corn flour, corn meal, grits,etc.). Rice in all forms (white, brown, basmati and enriched rice). Also amaranth, buckwheat (kasha), Montina, millet, quinoa, teff, sorghum and soy.

The following ingredients:

Annatto, glucose syrup, lecithin, maltodextrin (even when it is made from wheat), oat gum, plain spices, silicon dioxide, starch, food starch and vinegar (only malt vinegar might contain gluten). Also citric, lactic and malic acids as well as sucrose, dextrose and lactose; and these baking products: arrowroot, cornstarch, guar and xanthan gums, tapioca four or starch, potato starch flour and potato starch, vanilla.

 

The following foods:

Milk, butter, margarine, real cheese, plain yogurt and vegetable oils including canola. Plain fruits, vegetables, (fresh, frozen and canned), meat, seafood, eggs, nuts, beans and legumes and flours made from them.

Distilled vinegar is gluten free. (See malt vinegar under NO below).
Distilled alcoholic beverages are gluten free because distillation effectively removes gluten from wheat

They are not gluten free if gluten-containing ingredients are added after distillation, but this rarely, if ever, happens.
Mono and diglycerides are fats and are gluten free.
Spices are gluten free. If there is no ingredient list on the container, it contains only the pure spice noted on the label.

 

EZ GLUTEN TEST STRIPS

Easy to use home test that will quickly detect the presence of gluten in foods. It is sensitive enough to detect levels of gluten as low as 10 parts per million (PPM). This simple test is also small and portable for use at restaurants or when traveling.

GENESURE TEST

Easy to use home cheek swab test that collects your DNA. Receive your cheek swabs for cell collection, return to Glutenpro in the envelope provided and in approx 2 weeks your genetic profile is ready!

NO

Wheat in all forms including spelt, kamut, triticale (a combination of wheat and rye), durum, einkorn, farina, semolina, cake flour, matzo (or matzah) and couscous.

The following ingredients:

Ingredients with “wheat” in the name including wheat starch, modified wheat starch, hydrolyzed wheat protein and pregelatinized wheat protein. Buckwheat, which is gluten free, is an exception.
Barley malt, which is usually made from barley, and malt syrup, malt extract, malt flavoring and malt vinegar.

 

Breaded or floured meat, poultry, seafood and vegetables. Also meat, poultry and vegetables when they have a sauce or marinade that contains gluten, such as soy and teriyaki sauces.
Licorice, imitation crab meat, beer, most is fermented from barley. (Specialty gluten-free beer is available from several companies.)at

MAYBE

Dextrin can be made from wheat, which would be noted on the label, and would not be gluten free.
Flavorings are usually gluten free, but in rare instances can contain wheat or barley. By law, wheat would have to be labeled. Barley is usually called malt flavoring. In extremely rare instances, neither barley nor malt is specified in a flavoring.

Modified food starch is gluten free, except when wheat is noted on the label, either as “modified wheat starch,” modified starch (wheat) or if the Contains statement at the end of the ingredients list includes wheat.

Oats used to be considered unsafe, but recent research has shown that a moderate amount of special pure oats is safe for most celiacs. Several companies produce oats specifically for the GF market. They are labeled gluten free.

 

Pharmaceuticals can contain gluten, although most are gluten free. Check with the pharmaceutical company, especially if you take the medication on a continuing basis.
Processed cheese (spray cheese, for example) may contain gluten. Real cheese is gluten free.
Seasonings and seasoning mixes could contain gluten. Wheat will be noted on the label as required by law.
Soy Sauce is usually fermented from wheat. However, some brands don’t include wheat and are gluten free. Read the label to be sure.

SPECIAL
CASES

Caramel color is almost always made from corn, but it can be made from malt syrup. However, in more than 10 years, we have not been able to find a single instance of a caramel color produced this way. Companies in North America say they use corn. You can consider caramel color GF.

Hydrolyzed vegetable protein is a phrase that under federal regulation should not be used on a food label. Food processors have to identify the “vegetable.” So you might read “hydrolyzed wheat protein,” which would not be gluten free, or “hydrolyzed soy protein,” which is gluten free.

HOW TO SHOP

The supermarket doesn’t have to be daunting even when you are new to the gluten-free diet. Here are some tips to help you fill your shopping cart with safe foods:

Produce

This is usually the first section of the grocery. That’s a good thing because you can eat almost everything here. All plain fruits and vegetables are gluten free. Load up on your favorites and treat yourself to the more exotic items.

Dairy

This is also a gluten-friendly spot. Many products in the dairy department are gluten free, including milk, butter, eggs, real cheese, and most yogurts.

Meat, poultry and fish

Plain meats, poultry and fish are gluten free. Avoid products that are breaded and read the label on any that have been marinated or seasoned. If wheat or malt flavoring is used it will most likely say so on label as the USDA has a policy of always labeling gluten.

Deli

Many cold cuts are gluten free and more are putting “gluten free” on their labels and on display case signs. This includes Boars Head and Thumans. You can check the gluten-free status of many brands on the Internet before going to the store.

Frozen foods

Most frozen foods are also processed, so read the labels. Ice cream, frozen yogurt and ice pops are often gluten free. Frozen plain fruits and vegetables are gluten free. Some processed meals are gluten free.

Processed food

These aisles present the real challenge because many processed foods contain gluten. The key to finding safe foods is to read every label carefully.
Start with foods that are likely to be gluten free.This includes plain canned fruits and vegetables, beans and legumes, plain white (including enriched) and brown rice, juice,soda, unflavored coffee and tea, salad dressing, canned tuna fish, tomato sauce, corn tortillas and tacos, peanut butter and jam.

Natural or Health Food

More regular supermarkets now have health or natural food sections. You will find specialty gluten-free products there. Lookfor gluten-free flours, baking mixes, rice and corn based pasta, cereal, snack and protein bars, and ready-made cookies, crackers and pretzels. Occasionally you will also find gluten-freeitems in the regular aisles.

EATING OUT

You can still enjoy eating out while following the gluten-free diet. Here are some tips to help you enjoy your meal.

1. If you can, check with the restaurant before you visit. Ask whether they offer gluten-free foods or can adjust to provide a gluten-free meal. More and more local and chain restaurants have gluten-free menus.

2. Try to arrive during off-peak times when the staff is less rushed, especially if it’s your first trip to a restaurant.

3. When you arrive, explain your needs clearly to the server. Although the gluten-free diet is becoming better known, most waiters and waitresses still won’t be sure what gluten is. Say you need to avoid wheat, including flour, bread crumbs and any sauces or seasonings made using them. Mention barley and rye, although these are less likely to be a problem. Point out that oil, cooking surfaces and utensils can’t be contaminated by foods that contain wheat, barley or rye. You can buy restaurant cards that can help you explain your needs.

4. Be polite and friendly. You’ll be surprised how motivated many servers, chefs and restaurant managers are to prepare a safe and delicious meal. But never take a risk that something might not be safe because you don’t want to question or burden the staff. You are the one most responsible for your diet even when you eat out.

5. Order sensibly. Stick with familiar entrees unless you can be sure that a more exotic dish can be made gluten free.

6. Try to avoid sauces, marinades or thickeners unless the server or chef can assure you that they are safe.

7. Bring some gluten-free crackers or bread. It will give you something to eat while your companions sample the bread basket. This is especially important for children.

8. You can order wine or champagne, which are made from grapes. Most beer is off limits, but some restaurants serve one of the specialty gluten-free beers. Otherwise, most alcoholic drinks are gluten free.

9. For dessert your choice will most likely be limited to ice cream, sherbet or sorbet, fresh fruit or real cheese. Some restaurants serve flourless cake.

10. Don’t be afraid to eat out with children. Although they are often less adventurous eaters, you can usually find something on the menu that works. Children tend to like plain hamburgers and chicken, as well as baked potatoes and salad. Sometimes you can put together a meal with a few safe items from the sides menu. Increasing awareness means even fast food restaurants are familiar with the gluten-free diet. You can check for gluten-free menu items on the Internet.

GLUTEN FREE KIDS

it’s a better time than ever to be a gluten-free kid. Here’s some advice to help you help your child thrive in today’s improved gluten-free world:

The In Crowd

Feeling different because of the food they eat is one of the biggest issues celiac kids face. But there are many new, kid-friendly gluten-free products similar to what all the other kids have. You can find gluten-free chicken nuggets, pizza, pretzels, bagels, sandwich cookies, animal crackers and a lot of other standard kid food.

 

Healthy food can be good

If you start when your child is young, you can teach him or her to like healthy gluten-free whole grains, as well as fruit and vegetables, nuts and beans. More attention is being paid to the nutritional value of gluten-free products, including enrichment, so look for foods that fit this bill. Give your child a daily vitamin to make up for nutrients that might be missing in his or her diet.

 

Scouts know what they are talking about

“Be prepared” should become your new motto. You have to make the extra effort to be sure you have gluten-free goodies and staples in stock. Many kids keep a stash of snacks in school for those days when an unexpected treat shows up.

 

Attitude is everything

Children who follow the gluten-free diet have successfully – and happily – gone from pre-school to college. Overall, they adapt to their diet very well if they have parents who take a positive, can-do attitude toward the diet. Don’t complain about the extra work it creates for you or the excessive cost of food. The diet can be a pain and sometimes you have to let your child vent frustration. Emphasize that the gluten-free diet will enable your child to feel well and grow normally..

 

Toting it with Style

If your child is young, find a sturdy, but appealing, insulated container for bringing foods to parties, friends’ houses and on the road. Young children don’t seem to be bothered by carrying their food. But as kids enter the pre-teen years it becomes embarrassing. Start putting food into small sturdy plastic bags or containers that fit in a back pack or purse, where it’s not so obvious.

Toting it with Style

If your child is young, find a sturdy, but appealing, insulated container for bringing foods to parties, friends’ houses and on the road. Young children don’t seem to be bothered by carrying their food. But as kids enter the pre-teen years it becomes embarrassing. Start putting food into small sturdy plastic bags or containers that fit in a back pack or purse, where it’s not so obvious.

EZ GLUTEN TEST STRIPS

Easy to use home test that will quickly detect the presence of gluten in foods. It is sensitive enough to detect levels of gluten as low as 10 parts per million (PPM). This simple test is also small and portable for use at restaurants or when traveling.

GENESURE TEST

Easy to use home cheek swab test that collects your DNA. Receive your cheek swabs for cell collection, return to Glutenpro in the envelope provided and in approx 2 weeks your genetic profile is ready!

WHAT ARE YOU WAITING FOR?

Glutenpro Inc.

6-2400 Dundas Street West, Suite 724
Mississauga, Ontario, Canada L5K 2K8

 

Phone

(416) 704-0573

E-mail

info@glutenpro.com

 

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